Russia and Noise

Nadin Brzezinski
9 min readNov 24, 2023

Let’s deal first with the Russian way of war and violations of the genocide convention. Here is a genuine violation. The transfer of children is a war crime. Russians don’t care. This is about Russification and a demographic collapse. So this is about one child, one family.

It is also about the well-connected and the erasure of identity. This child is too young to remember where she was born. She will grow up as an excellent Russian citizen. She will likely need to learn what it is to be a Ukrainian. This story is as old as the Russia of the Tsars. And since her origin is also changed in her documents, it’s as if she was never born in Ukraine:

The head of A Just Russia party, Sergei Mironov, and his wife secretly adopted a child taken from Ukraine, changing both his name and place of birth in the documents.

At the end of August 2022, Mironov’s wife Inna Varlamova arrived in the Kherson region along with Mironov’s first deputy in the State Duma, Yana Lantratova. They didn’t leave alone. Local occupation authorities issued a power of attorney for them to remove two children from the Kherson orphanage — 10-month-old Margarita Prokopenko and two-year-old Ilya Vashchenko, writes “Important Stories”.

A week after being deported from Ukraine, Margarita and Ilya ended up in the Moscow region. To adopt a child in Russia, you need to apply to the court. These cases are considered in a special order. In November 2022, such a case was heard in the Podolsk City Court of the Moscow Region. “Important Stories” has documents at its disposal that indicate: a month after the court decision, in December 2022, Sergei Mironov and Inna Varlamova adopted Margarita Prokopenko, who was taken from Kherson. The girl became Marina Sergeevna Mironova. Not only her name and parents were changed, but also her place of birth: instead of Ukrainian Kherson — Podolsk near Moscow. A source familiar with the situation of Margarita and Ilya told Important Stories that Margarita’s biological mother was deprived of parental rights and her father died, but she has other relatives. Ilya’s fate is completely unknown.

“This is considered genocide and violates paragraph “e” of Art. 2 of the Convention on the Prevention of Genocide: forcible transfer of children from one human group to another. These children often have relatives or…

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Nadin Brzezinski

Historian by training. Former day to day reporter. Sometimes a geek who enjoys a good miniatures game. You can find me at CounterSocial, Mastodon and rarely FB